Untitled; Shely (right of triptych), 2013

  • oil on paper on wood
  • 30 x 139,7 cm
Untitled; Shely (right of triptych)

Untitled; Shely (middel of triptych), 2013

  • oil on paper on wood
  • 30 x 139,7 cm
Untitled; Shely (middel of triptych)

Untitled, Shely (left of triptych), 2013

  • oil on paper on wood
  • 30 x 139,7 cm
Untitled, Shely (left of triptych)

Prscilla with vines 4, 2007

  • Oil on cardboard laid down on plywood
  • 30,5 x 46 cm
Prscilla with vines 4

Untitled; Olga in the park, 2010

  • oil on paper on board
  • 12 x 18 inches
Untitled; Olga in the park

Untitled, Olga in the park, 2010

  • Oil on paper
  • 26 x 36 inch
Untitled, Olga in the park

Untitled, Olga in the park, 2010

  • Oil on paper on board
  • 12 x 18 inch
Untitled, Olga in the park

Untitled; Priscilla in the park,18 x 12 in, 2010

Untitled; Priscilla in the park,18 x 12 in, 2010

Untitled; Catherine (triptych), 2013

  • oil on paper on wood
  • 30 x 139,7 cm
Untitled; Catherine (triptych)

Untitled; Catherine (triptych), 2013

  • oil on paper on wood
  • 30 x 139,7 cm
Untitled; Catherine (triptych)

Untitled; Catherine (triptych), 2013

  • oil on paper on wood
  • 30 x 139,7 cm
Untitled; Catherine (triptych)

Untitled; Priscilla (triptych), 2013

  • oil on paper on wood
  • 30 x 139,7 cm
Untitled; Priscilla (triptych)

Untitled; Priscilla (triptych), 2013

  • oil on paper on wood
  • 30 x 139,7 cm
Untitled; Priscilla (triptych)

Untitled; Priscilla (triptych), 2013

  • oil on paper on wood
  • 30 x 139,7 cm
Untitled; Priscilla (triptych)

Yigal Ozeri

Yigal Ozeri (Israel, 1958) lives and works in New York, where his female- oriented oeuvre has created quite a sensation. Ozeri’s unique, refined technique brings his models to life in all their beauty and vulnerability. His work, depicting his ‘anima’, the female archetype, conveys a positive message of hope, freedom and love of life: woman as the source of life, fertility and Eros. His new show Triads reflects Ozeri’s continued interest in capturing the spirit of his subjects, be they ageless sirens, pre-Raphaelite women of folklore, or youthful figures in contemporary garb. Through his heartfelt quest to capture his muses’ energy, he creates work that transcends materiality, combining meticulously-rendered details with spontaneous and loose brushstrokes. Wispy flyaway hairs, minute droplets of water, glimmering reflections of light, and crisp folds of wrinkled clothing stand out against hazy backgrounds and blurred terrain.

In the series of hyper-realistically painted triptychs, shown at Rutger Brandt Gallery, Ozeri again lifts his art to a higher plane. In Triads, each triptych displays subtle progressions of movement, like movie stills, frozen in time. Instilling temporal, fleeting qualities, which challenge Ozeri’s ritualistic translation of the perfect trinity into ideally balanced triptych composition.

The triptych form, associated with icons and early Christian altarpieces, adds new depth to Ozeri’s veneration of the female form. In this new take on the classic triptych he places woman on a pedestal, irreverently combining the spiritual with the cinematographic. His subtle references to art history include a contemporary Ophelia: an iconic portrayal of a beautiful but vulnerable young woman whose expression and intense gaze are brought to life by Ozeri’s subtle brushstrokes. Drawn in by the delicate features of the paintings, viewers begin to discover that the portraits demand further contemplation beyond their immediate visual impact. In these carefully arranged compositions, the young women gradually and elegantly reveal layers of underlying palpable emotion, thoughtfully capturing intimate moments which unveils a young woman’s psyche. By painstakingly re-creating photographs, Ozeri “breathes life into the fleeting moments that he had captured, challenging the momentary recording of the photograph, turning the temporal to the eternal. If any spirit had been stolen in the photographing process, Ozeri lovingly restores it to the women depicted. The paintings, accordingly, are not to be read as photorealistic, but rather, as transcending reality, a visual meditation on the soul.”

Ozeri begins his process for these paintings by bringing a photographic crew to diverse landscapes in which he places the young women within the final composition in order to get precisely the results he is seeking. After choosing among the resulting images, he takes these and begins the painting process. The results are cinematic portraits of almost photographic realism. Their carefully staged, conceptual installations reflect the high-definition realism that today pervades media including television and movies; while their almost invisible brushstrokes, in the manner of traditional trompe l’oeil painting, play on concepts of perception and illusion.

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